Stephen Rees's blog

Thoughts about the relationships between transport and the urban area it serves

Returning from a two-decade road trip to find a region at the crossroads

with one comment

Miro Cernetig, Vancouver Sun

Being a broadsheet, the Sun gives its opinion writers a lot more space – 3 times as much for the new municipal affairs writer. In a substantial piece, he compares Metro Vancouver with other cities around the world – using sources like Grist – and finds us wanting. He also flags up Gordon Campbell’s upcoming announcement at UBCM and notes

I’m also keen to hear just how our hybrid-driving leader squares building bigger bridges and wider highways for more cars with the hard fact the automobile is the region’s biggest source of greenhouse gases.

And he’s not alone there. I am looking forward to reading more coverage of the region from him. But so far I do not think there is going to be quite as much to argue about, as he seems to be a lot “greener” than his colleagues or his editorial board

Wherever you stand on climate change — believer, denier or agnostic — there are undeniably big ideas at play that will shape the next generation of cities.

It is not a matter of faith. The “deniers” can only attack by throwing doubt where there is none in the scientific community. There has not been one single piece of research in a peer reviewed scientific journal which challenges the consensus that has existed among scientists in this field for many years. The same technique was used by the tobacco industry to throw doubt on the link between smoking and lung cancer. You cannot be agnostic in the face of evidence such as the recent reports of the shrinking of the arctic ice sheet – global warning is not only happening it is accelerating, and we have no alternative but to reduce our growing use of fossil fuels, as well as mitigating the inevitable rise in sea level. Certenig should be alright for a bit in Kits – but I am seriously considering moving from Richmond.

One Response

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  1. There are a lot of good reasons to move from Richmond. Including the problem of Fraser flooding (the commonly held belief has far too much faith in dykes, even when they are being maintained) and the problem of liquification during an earthquake.

    Richmond should never have been built, and should certainly not be allowed to expand. Oh, and if you’re moving from Richmond, don’t go to Chilliwack, that town is built in a lake bottom.

    Paul

    September 24, 2007 at 10:15 pm


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