Stephen Rees's blog

Thoughts about the relationships between transport and the urban area it serves

Archive for August 2019

Vancouver Mural Festival

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This afternoon we took a different kind of a walk. Instead of one of the beaches or the forest, this took in the industrial side of the city. Each year there is a mural festival in Vancouver where artists from here and around the world paint the sides of buildings.

There are several blog posts from 2017 this is the first of four.

Right now I am fighting with the flickr web site, which is where I usually put most of my pictures. I had hoped with their new independent status that they would become more reliable. Sadly, they are still far too often showing the “bad panda” excuse page. So I have uploaded this year’s pictures to the WP media library, in case flickr lets you down too.

You can find a map and other useful information on the Vancouver Mural Festival webpage

Garriya by Sonny Green: Australia
Pablo Zamudio
K C Hall : Raven Transformation
Homecoming by Kathy Ager
Eva Eskelinen
Sebastian Curi
William Liaou
Alex Joukov “Status Symbol”
“Cosmic Breeze” by Olivia de Liberto
Oneo

Sadly an artist coming here from Japan can get no respect from the local moronic “taggers” who have already defaced the mural (bottom right).

I posted a larger stitched panorama on flickr

Oneo panorama
Medianeras
SatOne
Charlie Edmiston
Pamela Pinard and Syd Danger

There are several more new murals on the other side of Main Street. I will try to get to them.

mural panorama
This mural is missing from the official map. It is adjacent to the Holden Courage memorial and is painted over previous murals on the same wall. (East 5th at Main, car park, nw corner)

Written by Stephen Rees

August 24, 2019 at 5:33 pm

Posted in Art

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A Picture of Progress

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I have been following the Washington State Department of Transportation on Flickr for quite a while. They are a remarkably progressive organisation and their photographers have captured some amazing images. But this evening they excelled themselves.

I am not going to comment I am just going to post the picture and their text.

Before and After photo of the I-5 and SR 16 interchange
Before and After photo of the I-5 and SR 16 interchange

“It’s easy to forget what the I-5/SR 16 interchange looked like before efforts began to widen the interchange. We found two photos that really show the comparison. The historic Nalley Valley interchange first opened to traffic in 1971. At the time, the average daily traffic volumes for both directions of SR 16 were 40,000 vehicles. Fast forward to 2018, and that number has tripled.”

And because I did not know where this is, here is a map

I5 SR16 Intersection Tacoma

Written by Stephen Rees

August 15, 2019 at 7:04 pm

Posted in Transportation

What I have been reading

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A useful list from the Guardian “Ten common myths about bike lanes – and why they’re wrong” which uses mostly UK data. And it is about a month old, but I only saw it today. For local readers, the switch of the Downtown Vancouver Business Association from anti-bike lane to pro, simply based on the business data of the members should be proof enough. It was thought that the loss of parking would hurt retailers, but it turns out that the people who ride bikes have more disposable income than those who spend a lot on owning and using a car.

Also from the Guardian – from their Cities section – is a useful explanation of how people use public spaces, based on research in New York City by SWA Group – in a gallery with useful commentary on the left hand side.

You can read “Our Renewable Future” by Richard Henberg and David Fridley on line. It was published a couple of years ago and if you haven’t had a chance to look at it you should.

New Trains from Bombardier for London Overground

“SERVICES over London Overground’s Gospel Oak – Barking line are now exclusively operated by four-car class 710 Aventra EMUs after the legacy two-car DMUs were phased out. One month free travel will be offered between August 31 and October 1 as compensation for the late delivery of the new fleet.” from the International Railway Journal

This used to be mainly a freight line transferring trains from the docks at Tilbury to the rest of the country, in between which ran one of the few peripheral passenger services around London (as opposed to to and from the centre). In recent years these services have been greatly improved by taking them into the regional service provider rather than the national railway which had tended to neglect them. Even though I lived in East Ham for 18 years or so, there was never really much need for us to use this line, but as a train enthusiast I found reasons to, later on.

I quite like the way that people who were inconvenienced by the switch now get compensated. This is common in Europe – but almost unheard of here. Apparently Canada is going to make airlines do something similar. Of course no compensation is ever considered for those stuck by the Greyhound withdrawal – or the appalling unreliability of VIA rail.

Written by Stephen Rees

August 6, 2019 at 5:17 pm