Stephen Rees's blog

Thoughts about the relationships between transport and the urban area it serves

Archive for the ‘Vancouver’ Category

Jericho Pier Renewal

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Jericho Pier is a regular destination for our walks, but I have many more photos taken from the pier than of the pier itself. I thought it might be a good idea to record what is there now, before work starts. Then I took a look at the City webpage

The Vancouver Park Board, in partnership with the Disabled Sailing Association, is renewing the aging pier at Jericho Beach and providing an accessible dock for sailors with disabilities.

The pier is a popular destination for locals and visitors as well as for fishing and crabbing. The ramp and float on the east side of the pier are used for emergency boat landing.

The reconstructed pier will:

  • Provide an accessible floating dock to provide for users of all ages and levels of mobility, accommodating up to 15 sailboats for the Disabled Sailing Association’s adaptive sailing program

  • Provide seating and views of Burrard Inlet and English Bay

  • Offer recreational fishing and crabbing opportunities

  • Accommodate future sea level rise

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So it looks like I have some time. It also looks like there is a conceptual design already although  not on the webpage at the time of writing. Ken Ohrn on the PriceTags page does have a rendering – but without any link to where he got it from – so I won’t steal it.

If you cannot make it to the open house at pier tomorrow  11:00am to 2:00pm, presentation materials and an online questionnaire will be available September 16 to October 2, 2017.

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Written by Stephen Rees

September 15, 2017 at 3:58 pm

South West Marine Drive bike lane

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Posted to YouTube by my social media contact Anthony Floyd.

All summer long this stretch of road has been closed to traffic to allow for the reconstruction of an important water main (he says – I thought it was sewers). This has resulted in much frustration, as traffic diverted to 41st and King Edward avenues while the work went on. And my favourite route to get away from traffic on Granville Street (Arbutus/West Boulevard/Angus Dr) was closed so it took a lot longer to get to the Airport.

There isn’t any reason for me to use that bike lane, but I am glad it’s there. The video illustrates really well how a bike lane makes it faster for a bike over driving. Compared to other things I have seen I note that the amount of physical protection (New Jersey barriers) is minimal. I also note that there is no-one parked in the bike lane!

I also note that there is always someone who wants to ride faster than you, in any circumstance.

 

Written by Stephen Rees

September 7, 2017 at 8:50 pm

Vancouver Mural Festival part 3

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The last two sites are remote from the others, in the industrial port area around the Cordova diversion.

Some of the murals are so large and difficult to get into one shot, so for these I have made large stitched panoramas that are hosted on my flickr photostream

Bicicleta Sem Frio

Tristesse Seliger "Infinite Line"

Stace Forand "Tiny Flora"

Stace Forand “Tiny Flora”
Stace Forand tattoos at the Steveston Tattoo Company, with a focus on contemporary Japanese art.

Destroy All Machines

More information

Written by Stephen Rees

August 15, 2017 at 8:48 pm

Vancouver Mural Festival part 2

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The northern end of Main Street at Industrial Avenue plus the Red Truck Brewery. There are seven more murals at Makerlabs, 780 East Cordova which are now covered in part 3. I have also now made up for missing half of the murals at Belvedere Court which is the large bottom image in the mosaic as well as the featured image (The Present).

Written by Stephen Rees

August 14, 2017 at 3:45 pm

Vancouver Mural Festival

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The festival ran from August 7 to 12 but, of course, the murals themselves will last a lot longer than that. Thinking to avoid the crowds, I went out the day after the festival events were over, but there were still plenty of people out taking pictures. Other blogs are already ahead of me with their postings and so far I have only covered those near Main Street from 14th to 4th. There’s a lot more to come but to get a taste of what else is out there see Ken Ohrn’s series on Price Tags. His pictures show many of the murals being created.

Click on the image in the gallery to see the larger version
Check out the festival’s page for artist details and so on – I have added a copy of their map at the bottom of this post.

 

Some of the murals were much bigger than I could get into one shot so there are some much larger, stitched panorama images on my flickr stream

VMF 2016 GODZILYA

Actually from the 2016 Festival but one of my personal favourites

Native Education College

Native Education Centre

Hoot Suite

And only in that last one was I unable to get a clear shot without people. I do not understand why so many were getting themselves photographed in front of the murals. This last one is on the Hoot Suite building.

Vancouver Mural Festival Map

Vancouver Mural Festival Map

There are now three further posts that cover the murals not shown in this one. There is also a flickr album of all of these pictures, which are downloadable at their original size and covered by a Creative Commons license.

Written by Stephen Rees

August 13, 2017 at 5:13 pm

TransLink on track for record-breaking ridership

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Source: TransLink on track for record-breaking ridership

I was expecting to actually see the Press Release and the stats from Translink instead of just a link, but this is easier than all the copy and paste I was going to have to do otherwise

Written by Stephen Rees

July 26, 2017 at 12:50 pm

Weekly Photo Challenge: Bridge

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The photo is of the Lions’ Gate Bridge across the Burrard Inlet in Vancouver BC taken in November last year.

On flickr I have more than 500 pictures with “bridge” in them. But this one had an instant appeal – both visually and also because it has a good story.

The original 1938 bridge looked a bit different – it was rebuilt in 2000 – 2001. There was a longish period of discussion over what should be done which did not just involve the bridge deck but also its approaches – through Stanley Park to the south and very busy roads it connected to in North and West Vancouver. There was much resistance to widening the causeway through the Park, but also great concern over how much traffic the areas around the bridge approaches could deal with. The deck has three lanes of traffic with a reversible centre lane to help cope with peak demands, but queueing for the bridge has long been – and still remains – an issue. Basically, while a lot of people wanted the crossing to be faster, there was no additional capacity available on both sides to allow for a wider bridge. Basically, we knew where the queues were going to be, and there was no desire to seem more of them.

Replacing the bridge deck, and linkages to the suspension cables, all took place while the bridge remained in service. The deck now has a nice smooth curve to it, replacing the former “bump” where the two ramps met in the middle. The sidewalks were also widened, and access for bicycles made much safer. This is in contrast to what seems to have become the default position in British Columbia, where road infrastructure is constantly expanded – and traffic then increases to fill the space available. The hope now is that with a much delayed change in the provincial government, the current plan to build a huge cable stayed bridge over the lower Fraser River will be abandoned in favour of a more realistic solution, the way that the challenge of the aging First Narrows bridge was dealt with. It isn’t actually necessary to build a new bridge to replace the tunnel, as refurbishing the existing sunken tubes and adding another, to carry a railway, is a cheaper and more effective solution, and poses much less threat to the ecologically sensitive Fraser estuary.

Written by Stephen Rees

July 5, 2017 at 10:48 am